Committees & Awards

2014 Award Information

At the ASA 2014 Annual Conference in San Francisco our Section presented the EMCA Graduate Student Paper Award and the EMCA Best Paper Award.

Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis Graduate Student Paper Award

The ASA EMCA Section's Graduate Student Paper Award was presented to Clara Bergen (UCLA) for her paper "Doing make-believe: Embodied action in children's imaginary character play".

The committee was chaired by Galina Bolden (Rutgers).



Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis Best Paper Award
The ASA EMCA Section’s Best Paper Award to Christian Greiffenhagen (University of Loughborough) and Wes Sharrock (University of Manchester) for their paper Does  mathematics look certain in the front, but fallible in the back?” (Social Studies of Science, 2011, 41[6]: 839-866.). 

The committee was chaired by Morana Alac (San Diego).



Call for 2014 Awards

Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis Graduate Student Paper Award
This award recognizes an outstanding paper written by a graduate student. Submitted papers should address ethnomethodological and/or conversation analytic topics and literature and should read well as a stand-alone paper. Maximum length is 10,000 words (excluding references). We seek to support graduate students’ original and best work, so we will consider unpublished papers or articles published in any journal or book. Co-authored papers are only acceptable if all authors are students. Only scholarly essays completed/published between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2013 will be considered for the award that will be presented at the ASA 2014 EMCA section’s business meeting in San Francisco. All nominees must be dues-paying members of the EMCA section (which requires ASA membership) for the year 2014. The Graduate Best Paper Award winner will receive $300 travel reimbursement for the ASA annual meeting in San Francisco.  Submission deadline: March 31, 2014.  The award committee will be chaired by Galina Bolden (Associate Professor, Department of Communication, Rutgers University).
To ensure the anonymity of the process, please send 2 versions of the paper, one anonymized, with subject
ASA GRAD STUDENT PAPER
to: Dirk vom Lehn (dirk.vom_Lehn@kcl.ac.uk )

Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis Best Paper Award
The ASA EMCA Best Paper award recognizes an outstanding journal article contributing to the field(s) of Ethnomethodology and/or Conversation Analysis.  Eligible articles must be published between September 1, 2012 and March 31, 2014, and will be presented at the ASA 2014 EMCA section’s business meeting in San Francisco.
This year the award committee will be chaired by Morana Alac, (Associate Professor in Communication and Science Studies, UC San Diego).
Please send submissions to Morana Alac (malac@ucsd.edu).
Deadline: April 4th, 2013



2013 Award Information

Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis Lifetime Achievement Award.

This award recognizes those who have made distinguished lifetime
career contributions to the fields of ethnomethodology and/or
conversation analysis. To nominate an individual for this award,
please submit the following: 1) A letter detailing the nominee’s
contributions to EMCA; 2) Relevant supporting materials, including a
list of the nominee’s publications; and 3) At least two additional
external letters speaking to the person’s contributions and impact on
the field(s). Nominations should be submitted by March 1, 2013 to: Tim
Berard, Department of Sociology, 215 Merrill Hall, PO Box 5190, Kent,
Ohio 44242 or emailed to tjberard@alumni.reed.edu (email preferred).

Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis Graduate Student Paper
Award [CHANGED DEADLINE]


This award recognizes an outstanding paper written by a graduate
student. Submitted papers should address ethnomethodological and/or
conversation analytic topics and literature and should read well as
stand-alone papers. Maximum length is 10,000 words (excluding
references). We seek to support graduate students’ original and best
work, so we will consider unpublished papers or articles published in
any journal or book. Co-authored papers are only acceptable if all
authors are students. Only scholarly essays completed/published
between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2012 will be considered for
awards made in August 2013. All nominees must be dues-paying members
of the EMCA section (which requires ASA membership) for the year 2013.
The Graduate Best Paper Award winner will receive $300 travel
reimbursement for the ASA annual meeting in New York.  Submission
deadline: March 29, 2013.  The award committee is led by Jon Hindmarsh
(King’s College London). But to ensure the anonymity of the process,
please send submissions to: dirk.vom_Lehn@kcl.ac.uk

Committee 
Jon Hindmarsh (King's College)
Tim Halkowski, University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point (US)
Eric Laurier, University of Edinburgh (UK)

Melvin Pollner Prize in Ethnomethodology [CHANGED DEADLINE]
The ASA Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis Section solicits
nominations for the Melvin Pollner Prize in Ethnomethodology. This
$1000 award honors the intellectual spirit and memory of Melvin
Pollner and will be given to an outstanding book, article, or chapter
published between 2008-2012 that addresses issues relating to
ethnomethodology in the inclusive sense reflected in Pollner’s
intellectual and research concerns. Nominations should be submitted no
later than March 29, 2013 and should include 1) full bibliographic
information on the nominated publication; 2) a link to a web site
where articles and/or chapters can be downloaded, a PDF copy of the
manuscript, or a hard copy of the manuscript (copies of books need not
be submitted with the initial nomination), and 3) a brief description
of the publication’s special contribution and how it reflects the
spirit of the award.  Please submit nominations to John Heritage,
Dept. of Sociology, University of California at Los Angeles, 264
Haines Hall, P.O. Box 951551, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1551 USA,
heritage@soc.ucla.edu

Committee
John Heritage - Chair (University of California, Los Angeles)
Paul Drew (University of York)
Doug Maynard  (University of Wisconsin)

Book Award

The book award recognizes an outstanding book (monograph or edited
volume) contributing to Ethnomethodology and/or Conversation Analysis.
 Eligible works must be published in 2011-2012. The deadline for
submissions is March 1, 2013.

Committee 
Patrick Watson (University of Waterloo)
Christian Greiffenhagen (University of Nottingham)
Michael Lynch (Cornell University)

2012 Award Winners
Comments by Robert Dingwall

Graduate Paper Award 2012 - Trevor Benjamin

The panel were unanimous in deciding that the award for best graduate student paper should
be awarded to Trevor Benjamin for his paper ‘When problems pass us by: Using “You
mean” to help locate the source of trouble”. This investigates other-initiated repairs to
interactional problems. An analysis of understanding checks marked by ‘you mean’ explores
the preference organization for repair, for contiguity over non-contiguity, and the work that
is done when this does not occur in the default position. The judges commended the way
in which the paper showed wide knowledge of relevant literature in the field and built on
this in a systematic fashion to identify and define a previously unremarked phenomenon.
This original observation was carefully documented through skilful analysis of a range of
materials. It establishes a foundation for a promising line of further investigations into
the preference for contiguity, which seems to characterize a number of actions in talk, in
English and related languages. It is a mature and sophisticated analysis by any standards and
particularly commendable in a scholar at the beginning of their career.


Best Paper Award - John Heritage

The best paper award had a strong field and each entrant had some support from at least one of the judges.  However, there was no dispute among them that John Heritage’s paper, ‘Epistemics in action: Action formation and territories of knowledge’, stood out as a landmark paper.  In effect, it redefines and reasserts Sacks’s original programme to create a systematic science of social action through the analysis of conversation.  As Heritage notes, CA has since tended to shy away from some of the radical implications of that call, partly to avoid some of the problems that arose with the grammatical approach of speech act theory.  First actions became neglected in favour of studying second and subsequent actions, leaving open the question of how interactions got going at all.  The key to this is epistemic status, which is prior to morphosyntactical features in establishing how an interaction comes to happen and to unfold in a particular direction.  Turn design and epistemic status combine to generate action.  The paper challenges conventional thinking in CA, as well as in sociology more generally and in cognate disciplines including linguistics, anthropology and psychology.  Heritage hints at a future engagement with the reductionist accounts of neuroscience.  This is a profound and profoundly original paper and a worthy winner of the award in any year.

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